Communities Across US Stand with Those Impacted by SandyComunidades En Todo EE.UU. Solidarias Con las/los Afectadas/os por Sandy

Freedom Road supports the following statement and the efforts of the undersigned Damage from Sandyorganizations.  CAAAV’s work in the wake of superstorm Sandy demonstrates that organizations committed to the multinational working class can mean the difference between life and death when disaster strikes.  The priorities of the ruling class and their agents of the state bureaucracy are undeniably apparent in moments like these, as Bloomberg proved in his hesitation to cancel the New York Marathon.  As climate-change induced severe weather events become more commonplace, it is our revolutionary obligation to be prepared.
El Camino para la Libertad apoya la siguiente declaración y los esfuerzos de las Damage from Sandyorganizaciones firmantes. El trabajo de CAAAV después de la supertormenta demuestra que las organizaciones comprometidas con la clase trabajadora multinacional puede significar la diferencia entre la vida y la muerte cuando ocurre un desastre. Las prioridades de la clase dominante y sus agentes de la burocracia estatal son claramente evidente en momentos como estos, como Bloomberg demostró en su vacilación para cancelar el maratón de Nueva York. Como el cambio climático provoca los fenómenos meteorológicos severos cada vez más frecuentemente, es nuestra obligación revolucionaria a estar preparadas/os.

Communities Across US Stand with Those Impacted by Sandy

To add your organization’s name to this statement, email michelle@movementgeneration.org .

We, community-based organizations and movements across the U.S. who are working for a Just Transition out of the climate crisis, stand in solidarity with the communities hit by Superstorm Sandy. We mourn for the lives lost in Haiti, Cuba, Canada, New York, New Jersey and all areas impacted by the storm. And we are inspired by the many expressions of solidarity as people work to care for one another under extremely challenging conditions.*

NYE shut downNYSE shut down by Sandy. Photo credit: AP

While millions were impacted, we know that people of color and low-income communities bear the brunt of extreme weather events as they often reside in unprotected areas stripped of wetlands and other protective natural barriers, and/or are contaminated by storm surges through toxic industry sites. In Haiti, when Hurricane Sandy hit, hundreds of thousands had only the shelter of makeshift tents since the January 2010 earthquake destroyed existing housing.

As we learn the full extent of damage from this huge storm, we are struck by the need for our communities and movements to prepare for rapidly changing conditions.

From Haiti, Ricot Jean-Pierre, Haitian Platform to Advocate Alternative Development (PAPDA) <http://www.grassrootsonline.org/where-we-work/haiti/haitian-platform-advocate-alternative-development-papda>  tells us, “the damage from hurricane demonstrated how the environment in Haiti has been destroyed by neoliberal policies that disproportionally affect the poorest of the poor. Now, it is only through SOLIDARITY with one another and engagement with all sectors–popular movements, women’s movements, peasant movements, youth movements–that we will transform our environment, protect life, and preserve our right to sovereignty in the places where we live.”

There will be many more shocks—acute moments of disruption such as extreme weather events—and slides—incremental disruptions such as sea level rise that play out over longer timeframes in devastating ways, if we are not prepared. The question is, how can we prepare to harness these shocks and slides to win the shifts we need in favor of people and the planet?

For decades, scientists have been warning those in governance  about the need to cut greenhouse gas emissions and about the potential impacts from climate change on different regions. But the politicians have been both silent and stuck.

In a recent op-ed in the Washington Post, James Hansen at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York blamed climate change for excessive drought, based on six decades of measurements, not computer models: “Our analysis shows that it is no longer enough to say that global warming will increase the likelihood of extreme weather and to repeat the caveat that no individual weather event can be directly linked to climate change. To the contrary, our analysis shows that, for the extreme hot weather of the recent past, there is virtually no explanation other than climate change.”

“Communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis have never been silent about the solutions that will save our planet and our soul as a society,” says Cecil Corbin-Mark of WE ACT for Environmental Justice in West Harlem. “We have advocated for bus rapid transit, affordable safe housing and resilient communities, green jobs through public investment, and policies that cut and eliminate carbon.”

Yet the failure to take climate change seriously has hampered our ability to effectively respond to these predictable shocks.

The post-Sandy activity on the ground has already exposed the incompetence of governments to respond effectively – particularly to needs in working class communities – and, in its place, grassroots , community-based efforts are springing up to provide basic needs and resources to communities in true acts of resilience.

CAAAV Sandy CAAAV providing food and water to Chinatown & Lower East Side residents. Photo credit: CAAAV

Says Helena Wong of CAAAV , “Today, we showed that the power of community can hold us together even through the toughest of times and it was done with lots of love, laughter, and hard work. Today, it was clear that even if City leaders do not acknowledge the work that we have done, we know we reached the people who needed it.”

An October 2012 comprehensive survey  found that some states and cities around the country are beginning to draw up plans, but they’re nowhere near sufficient. “Most adaptation actions to date appear to be incremental changes,” the survey says, “not the transformational changes that may be needed in certain cases to adapt to significant changes in climate.”

While elites have been silent or stuck, grassroots forces in New York and New Jersey have been loud and clear on the path for real solutions:

* WeACT in West Harlem has been fighting for bus-rapid transit for public sector jobs, healthy communities, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

* Right to the City and Grassroots Global Justice Alliance  groups like CAAAV, Picture the Homeless, Make the Road, and many more work to end displacement and economic inequity—both of which are integrally connected to climate change.

* The New York City Environmental Justice Alliance‘s  Waterfront Justice Project – NYC’s first citywide community resiliency campaign – has continued working to protect NYC communities from the compounded burden of toxic inundation when storm surges like Hurricane Sandy hit.

Here are a few key facts about the factors that created this Superstorm Sandy:

– 2012 broke all records for melting of Arctic sea ice

– Sea levels in the Northeast U.S. are rising 3-4 times faster than the global average; they are already 9-10” higher than in 1900.

– Higher sea levels mean far greater flooding impacts in low-lying urban areas.

You can see how a combination of rising sea levels, tides, and storms could affect different parts of the United States with this helpful GIS mapping tool from Climate Central.

– Melting Arctic ice also creates negative pressure in the jet stream, forcing large cold air fronts to move south

– Temperatures in the Northeast are 5 degrees warmer than usual. Warmer air holds more moisture which means more rainfall.

– Warmer ocean temperatures add more energy to storms.

* Ironbound Community Corporation , a member of the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives and the New Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance has been crafting ‘Zero Waste” solutions that create recycling and composting jobs while drastically reducing climate and toxic pollution from landfills and incinerators.

* There are countless efforts to reclaim vacant lots for community gardens and to increase access to healthy food as part of a regional food system.

*  The Indigenous Environmental Network  has been working with Indigenous communities throughout Canada and the U.S. who are vehemently fighting to protect their lands and communities from  fossil fuels development, like the tar sands mines and the Keystone XL, Kinder Morgan and Enbridge Northern Gateway pipelines.

* Small farmer groups in Haiti have organized to reclaim the right to grow food for the people rather than for global food trade.

The efforts of these grassroots and indigenous groups are charting a path to new economies defined by public transit, zero waste, community housing, food sovereignty, wetlands restoration, clean community-owned power, and local self-governance. These efforts foster community resilience – critical to weathering the shocks and slides ahead.

The key to surviving these events and rebuilding thereafter relies on the creation and implementation of community-led solutions that value the lives of people and the health of the environment.  This means transitioning out of an economy that makes some populations and communities vulnerable at the expense of others and toward an economy that works for people and the planet.

The days, weeks, and months ahead will be full of decision-making about how to invest precious resources in the reconstruction of communities. The voices of those working for root cause solutions must be heard! Community-led solutions will break the silence and move us toward a just transition.

* The organizations circulating this statement are working together to develop a Just Transition Campaign to create public sector jobs for zero waste, food sovereignty, local clean energy, public transit, and healthy communities. We welcome other organizational sign-ons by emailing michelle@movementgeneration.org .

Just Transition Campaign Organizations:

Alternatives for Community and Environment (ACE), Boston, MA
The Alliance for Greater New York (ALIGN), NY, NY
Alliance for Appalachia
Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN), California
Black Mesa Water Coalition (BMWC), Black Mesa, Arizona
Communites for a Better Environment (CBE), California
Center for Earth, Energy, and Democracy (CEED), Minneapolis, MN
Community to Community, Bellingham, WA
Environmental Justice Climate Change Initiative (EJCC), Washington DC
Energy Justice Network (EJN), Philadelphia, PA
East Michigan Environmental Action Council (EMEAC), Detroit, MI
Global Alliance of Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA)
Grassroots Global Justice Alliance (GGJ)
Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP), Burlington, VT
Grassroots Intl, Boston, MA
Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN)
Institute for Policy Studies Sustainable Energy & Economy Network (IPS-SEEN), Washington DC
Just Transition Alliance (JTA)
Jobs with Justice
Kentuckians for the Commonwealth (KFTC), London, KY
Labor Community Strategy Center (LCSC), Los Angeles, CA
Labor Network for Sustainability (LNS)
Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), Chicago, IL
Movement Generation (MG), Oakland, CA
Movement Strategy Center (MSC), Oakland, CA
NYC Environmental Justice Alliance (NY-EJA), NY, NY
People Organized to Demand Environmental and Economic Rights (PODER), San Francisco, CA
People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER), San Francisco, CA
Rising Tide North America
Right to the City Alliance
Ruckus Society
smartMeme
Southwest Organizing Project (SWOP), Albequerque, NM
Southwest Workers Union (SWU), San Antonio, TX
UPROSE, NY, NY
US Food Sovereignty Alliance
Vermont Worker Center, Vermont

*******************
SUPPORT CAAAV’S RELIEF EFFORTS:
With the help of over 100 volunteers, CAAAV is distributing supplies directly to residents of high rise buildings who are still without power, checking on elderly residents, and helping people reconnect. Please send donations directly to them or other grassroots providing direct support.Comunidades En Todo EE.UU. Solidarias Con las/los Afectadas/os por Sandy

Para agregar el nombre de su organización a esta declaración, manda un correo electrónico a: michelle@movementgeneration.org.

Nosotras/os, las organizaciones comunitarias y los movimientos en los EE.UU. que están trabajando para una Transición Justa de la crisis climática, en solidaridad con las comunidades afectadas por Superstorm Sandy. Nos hace llorar por la pérdida de vidas en Haití, Cuba, Canadá, Nueva York, Nueva Jersey y todas las áreas afectadas por la tormenta. Y nos sentimos inspiradas/os por las numerosas muestras de solidaridad como la gente trabaja para cuidar unas/unos a otras/os, en condiciones extremadamente difíciles.*

NYE shut down
Bolsa de Valores en Nueva York cerrado por Sandy. Foto: AP

Mientras millones se vieron afectadas/os, sabemos que las personas de color y de bajos ingresos son los más afectadas/os por los fenómenos climáticos extremos ya que a menudo residen en zonas no protegidas despojados de los humedales y otras barreras protectoras naturales, y / o están contaminados por las mareas de tormenta por los sitios de la industria tóxica. En Haití, cuando el Huracán Sandy golpeó la playa, cientos de miles sólo tenía el abrigo de tiendas de campaña desde que el terremoto de enero 2010 destruyó las viviendas existentes.

A medida que aprendemos el alcance total de los daños causados por la enorme tormenta, nos llama la atención la necesidad de nuestras comunidades y movimientos para prepararse para las condiciones rápidamente cambiantes.

Desde Haití, Ricot Jean-Pierre de Haitian Platform to Advocate Alternative Development (PAPDA) (Plataforma Haitiana para Abogar por el Desarrollo Alternativo (PAPDA)) nos dice, “el daño causado por el huracán demostró como el ambiente en Haití ha sido destruido por las políticas neoliberales que afectan desproporcionadamente a las/los más pobres. Ahora bien, es sólo mediante la solidaridad y el compromiso con todos los movimientos de los sectores –movimientos populares, movimientos de mujeres, movimientos campesinos, los movimientos de la juventud– que vamos a transformar nuestro medio ambiente, proteger la vida y preservar nuestro derecho a la soberanía en los lugares donde vivimos”.

Habrá muchos más choques—momentos intensos de perturbación tales como eventos climáticos extremos—y derrumbes—interrupciones incrementales tales como el aumento del nivel del mar que manifestarán durante largos plazos en formas devastadoras, si no estamos preparadas/os. La cuestión es, ¿cómo podemos prepararnos para aprovechar estos choques para ganar los cambios que necesitamos en favor de los pueblos y el planeta?

Durante décadas, las/los científicos han estado advirtiendo a aquellas/os gobernantes sobre la necesidad de reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y sobre los impactos potenciales del cambio climático en diferentes regiones. Pero las/los políticos han sido a la vez silenciosas/os y apegadas/os.

En un reciente artículo de opinión en el Washington Post, James Hansen del Instituto Goddard de Estudios Espaciales en Nueva York puso la culpa en el cambio climático para la sequía excesiva, basado en seis décadas de mediciones, no en los modelos informáticos: “Nuestro análisis muestra que ya no es suficiente decir que el calentamiento global aumentará la probabilidad de que el clima extremo y repetir la advertencia de que ningún evento meteorológico individual puede estar directamente relacionado con el cambio climático. Por el contrario, nuestro análisis muestra que, para el extremo clima caliente de los últimos años, prácticamente no hay otra explicación que el cambio climático”.

“Las comunidades en las primeras filas de la crisis del clima nunca han guardado silencio acerca de las soluciones que salvarán a nuestro planeta y nuestra alma como una sociedad”, dice Cecil Corbin-Mark de WE ACT por la Justicia Ambiental en el oeste de Harlem. “Hemos abogado por el tránsito rápido, viviendas seguras y asequibles en comunidades resistentes, trabajos verdes a través de la inversión pública y las políticas que reducen y eliminan el carbono”.

Sin embargo, el hecho de no tomar en serio el cambio climático ha obstaculizado nuestra capacidad para responder con eficacia a estos choques predecibles.

La actividad posterior a Sandy en el suelo ya ha expuesto a la incompetencia de los gobiernos para responder con eficacia – en particular a las necesidades de las comunidades de la clase trabajadora – y, en su lugar, esfuerzos comunitarios están surgiendo para satisfacer las necesidades básicas y los recursos a las comunidades en verdaderos actos de resistencia.

CAAAV Sandy
CAAAV Suministra Alimentos y Agua al Barrio Chino y Residentes del Lower East Side. Crédito de la imagen: CAAAV

Dice Helena Wong de CAAAV: “Hoy hemos demostrado que el poder de la comunidad nos puede mantener unidas/os incluso a través de los momentos más difíciles y fue hecho con mucho amor, risa y trabajo duro. Hoy en día, es evidente que, incluso si las/los líderes municipales no reconoce el trabajo que hemos hecho, sabemos que nosotras/os llegamos a las personas que lo necesitan”.

Un estudio exhaustivo en octubre de 2012 encontró que algunos estados y ciudades de todo el país están comenzando a elaborar planes, pero están muy lejos de ser suficientes. “La mayoría de las acciones de adaptación hasta la fecha parecen ser cambios incrementales,” según la encuesta: y no “son los cambios transformacionales que pueden ser necesarios en algunos casos para adaptarse a los cambios significativos en el clima”.

Mientras que las élites han guardado silencio o estancados, las fuerzas de base en Nueva York y Nueva Jersey han sido fuerte y claro en el camino para las soluciones reales:

* WeACT en West Harlem ha luchado por el tránsito rápido de autobús para los empleos del sector público, para la salud comunitaria y la reducción de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero.

* Derecho a la Ciudad y Grassroots Global Justice Alliance grupos, tanto como CAAAV, Picture the Homeless, Make the Road, y muchos más trabajan más para acabar con el desplazamiento y la inequidad económica, tanto de los que están íntimamente conectados con el cambio climático.

* La primera campaña municipal de NYC resistencia de la comunidad, La New York Environmental Justice Alliance Waterfront Justice Project, ha seguido trabajando para proteger a las comunidades de Nueva York de la carga compuesta de inundación tóxica cuando surgen las tormentas como el huracán Sandy.

Aquí están algunos hechos clave sobre los factores que crearon esta Superstorm Sandy:

- 2012 rompió todos los records de la desaparición del hielo marino del Ártico

- El nivel del mar en el Noreste de EE.UU. está aumentando 3-4 veces más rápido que el promedio global, ya que son a 9 hasta 10 pulgadas “más alto que en 1900.

- El aumento de los niveles del mar significa impactos mucho mayores inundaciones en las zonas bajas urbanas.

Puedes ver cómo la combinación de los niveles del mar, las mareas y las tormentas podrían afectar a diferentes partes de los Estados Unidos con la herramienta GIS de Centro Climático.

- La fusión del hielo ártico también crea una presión negativa en la corriente de aire jet, lo que obliga grandes frentes de aire frío a moverse hacia el sur

- Las temperaturas en el noreste están a 5 grados más caliente de lo normal. El aire caliente retiene más humedad, lo que significa más precipitaciones.

- Las temperaturas más cálidas del océano agrega más energía a las tormentas.

* Ironbound Community Corporation, miembro de la Alianza Global para Alternativas a la Incineración y el New Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance ha estado elaborando soluciones de “Basura Cero” que crean puestos de trabajo y reciclaje de compostaje mientras que reduce drásticamente la contaminación del clima y la polución tóxica de los sitios de basura e incineradores.

* Existen innumerables esfuerzos para recuperar terrenos para jardines comunitarios y aumentar el acceso a alimentos saludables como parte de un sistema alimentario regional.

* La Red Ambiental Indígena ha estado trabajando con las comunidades indígenas a través de Canadá y los EE.UU. que están luchando fuertes por proteger sus tierras y comunidades del desarrollo de los combustibles fósiles, como las minas de arenas bituminosas y el Keystone XL, Morgan Kinder y oleoductos de Enbridge Northern Gateway.

* Los grupos de pequeñas/os agricultoras/es en Haití se han organizado para reclamar el derecho a cultivar alimentos para el pueblo y no para el comercio mundial de alimentos.

Los esfuerzos de estas organizaciones de base y grupos indígenas están forjando un camino hacia nuevas economías definidas por el transporte público, residuos cero, viviendas comunitaria, la soberanía alimentaria, la restauración de los humedales, la energía limpia de propiedades comunitarias, la autonomía política local. Estos esfuerzos fomenta la firmeza comunitaria, la cual es esencial para poder aguantar los choques y derrumbes en un pronto futuro.

La clave para sobrevivir a estos eventos y para la reconstrucción después se basa en la creación e implementación de soluciones dirigidas por la comunidad que valoran las vidas de las personas y la salud del medio ambiente. Esto significa la transición de una economía que hace que algunas poblaciones y comunidades sean vulnerables, a costo de las demás y hacia una economía que funcione para la gente y el planeta.

Los días, las semanas y los meses por delante estará lleno de un proceso de tomar decisiones sobre cómo invertir valiosos recursos en la reconstrucción de las comunidades. ¡Las voces de las personas que trabajan para las soluciones debe ser escuchadas! Las soluciones creadas por la comunidad romperá el silencio y nos llevará hacia una transición justa.

* Las organizaciones que circulan esta declaración están trabajando juntas para desarrollar una campaña de transición justa para crear puestos de trabajo del sector público para los residuos cero, la soberanía alimentaria, la energía limpia local, transporte público, y comunidades saludables. Damos la bienvenida a otras organizaciones que quieren poner su nombre en apoyo. Si le interesa, manda un correo electrónico a: michelle@movementgeneration.org.

Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP), Burlington, VT
Grassroots Intl, Boston, MA
Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN)
Institute for Policy Studies Sustainable Energy & Economy Network (IPS-SEEN), Washington DC
Just Transition Alliance (JTA)
Jobs with Justice
Kentuckians for the Commonwealth (KFTC), London, KY
Labor Community Strategy Center (LCSC), Los Angeles, CA
Labor Network for Sustainability (LNS)
Little Village Environmental Justice Organization (LVEJO), Chicago, IL
Movement Generation (MG), Oakland, CA
Movement Strategy Center (MSC), Oakland, CA
NYC Environmental Justice Alliance (NY-EJA), NY, NY
People Organized to Demand Environmental and Economic Rights (PODER), San Francisco, CA
People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER), San Francisco, CA
Rising Tide North America
Right to the City Alliance
Ruckus Society
smartMeme
Southwest Organizing Project (SWOP), Albuquerque, NM
Southwest Workers Union (SWU), San Antonio, TX
UPROSE, NY, NY
US Food Sovereignty Alliance
Vermont Worker Center, Vermont

*******************

APOYAR A LOS ESFUERZOS DE SOCORRO CAAAV:

Con la ayuda de más de 100 voluntarias/os, CAAAV está distribuyendo suministros directamente a las/los residentes en los edificios de gran altura que todavía están sin energía eléctrica, están visitando a las/los residentes de edad avanzada, y ayudando a las personas a “volver a conectar”. Por favor envíe sus donaciones directamente a ellas/os u otras bases de apoyo directo.

Download this piece as a PDF
FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share
This entry was posted in Ecological Crisis. Bookmark the permalink.